Pretty Quiet Here until I have internet…

Northern California  – January 28, 2013 – “Blog Post # 400”

My seemingly endless ‘de facto homeless’ summer-fall-early winter, from the beginning of July when I left Colorado, till mid-January… has AT LAST been replaced with living remotely in a wood-stove-heated cabin in a dark moist forest.   Yay!  ;-)  Working (well beyond more-than-full-time) allowed me to buy a used car, which in turn opened up living possibilities outside of town.  This is one huge leap forward from just a backpack and a storage unit, I can say that much.  Still rough at times, but it beats sleeping in a car by a long shot.  The latter gets old fast, especially in the frigid weather it was.  Anyhow, all has shifted for the better, including the weather (although the latter is more than likely just ‘temporarily’).

Anyhow, just this quick “blog post note”, ’cause I’ll have my hands full with working in the woods, weather depending: until I have my own high-speed internet, I will rarely even be online. Once plugged in to the internet again, I’ll more than likely catch up with sharing an avalanche of blog posts from nature photography, to what I’ve been learning re. Fukushima and the nuclear industry in general, climate change developments, linguistic interests, ponderings on the nature of civilization, and most definitely some artistic inspirations that are waiting to be brought to fruition.

But since I’m here and I gift myself 18 minutes to add to this blog post…  Let’s see… So “where am I now?’ …

Well, language-wise, I’m in Tsungwe land:

A page (to which I added some current-day coastal towns, and circled the Willow Creek area) from the most excellent book, 'Two Peoples, One Place: Humboldt History, Volume 1',  by Ray Raphael & Freeman House  (Humboldt County Historical Society, 2007).  Click image for your copy!

Native Language Groupings of Humboldt County, California –  This is a page (to which I added some current-day coastal towns, and circled the Willow Creek area) from the most excellent book, ‘Two Peoples, One Place: Humboldt History, Volume 1’, by Ray Raphael & Freeman House (Humboldt County Historical Society, 2007). Click image to buy this book!

I haven’t explored the local river villages of Willow Creek, Hoopa, Orleans, etc. yet.  Perhaps some time this year…

Weather wise,… out here in the Trinity River Watershed of Far-Northern Coastal California, locally it appears most snow has melted below 3500 ft, although it still freezes at night “all the way down into town” (Willow Creek’s altitude is only 610 ft).

Today’s Forecast looks like I might get some stuff done  ;-) …before it turns to rain and snow again, which is pretty much guaranteed in this temperate rainforest.

WC_Jan28_2013_10d_forecast_intellicast

Willow CReek Forecast (January 28, 2013)
Temps in CELCIUS.

‘Temperate Rainforest’ (with incredible biodiverity!) is another way to describe where I now roam.  A mixture of firs, cedars, madrone, manzanita, tan oak, alder, lots of poison oak vines, etc.  Just beautiful.  Couple impressions from the neighborhood:

DSC05092

a rainy day in the Redwood Creek watershed, the next valley over, late January 2013.
Photo by © Michaël Van Broekhoven

...Photo by © Michaël Van Broekhoven, 2013.

A nice mixture of firs, cedars, oaks, madrone, poison oak, etc.
Photo by © Michaël Van Broekhoven, 2013.

A very lovely neighbor: the Madrone (called 'madrona' north of the Syskious Mountains, and 'Arbutus' in British Colombia, Canada).Photo by © Michaël Van Broekhoven, 2013.

A very lovely neighbor: the Madrone (called ‘madrona’ north of the Syskious Mountains, and ‘Arbutus’ in British Colombia, Canada).
Photo by © Michaël Van Broekhoven, 2013.

When I have internet, I’ll be back.  

Until then!  Ciao.

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